Observatory of the National Policy on Tobacco Control

WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control


Last updated: 10/03/2022 | 11h34

The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) is the first treaty negotiated under the auspices of the World Health Organization. Its objective is “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke by providing a framework for tobacco control measures to be implemented by the Parties at the national, regional and international levels in order to reduce continually and substantially the prevalence of tobacco use and exposure to tobacco smoke” (article 3).

On October 27, 2005, Brazil's adherence to the FCTC was ratified by the Senate (Brasil, 2005) and its promulgation by presidential decree took place in January 2006 (Brasil, 2006).

Since the implementation of the FCTC measures became the National Policy on Tobacco Control in Brazil

The WHO FCTC currently has 182 signatory States Parties.

The National Commission for FCTC Implementation (CONICQ) is responsible to propose, implement, consolidate and evaluate the measures for WHO FCTC implementation in Brazil.

 

The Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products and the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

The Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products is an international treaty with the objective of eliminating all forms of illicit trade in tobacco products through a package of measures to be taken by countries acting in cooperation with each other: it is a global solution to a global problem.

The Protocol was developed in response to the growing illicit trade in tobacco products, often across borders. Illicit trade poses a serious threat to public health because it increases access to – often cheaper – tobacco products, thus fueling the tobacco epidemic and undermining tobacco control policies. It also causes substantial losses in government revenues, and at the same time contributes to the funding of international criminal activities.

The Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products is linked to article 15 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC/WHO). 

Brazil's accession to the Protocol was ratified by the National Congress in 2017, through Legislative Decree No. 185, of December 11, 2017 (Brasil, 2017) and its promulgation by presidential decree took place in 2018, through Decree No. 9,516 (Brasil, 2018).

When approving the ratification of the Protocol in 2017, the Federal Senate attached an interpretative declaration recognizing that its effective implementation depends, at the national level, on intersectoral coordination composed of competent government bodies (Brasil, 2017). As a result, Decree No. 9,517 of October 1, 2018 (Brasil, 2018) was published, instituting the Committee for Implementation of the Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products, under the coordination of the Civil House and including various bodies that play a relevant role in this matter. The interpretative declaration linked to the Legislative Decree of the Senate also pointed to the need for the “Brazilian Government to make diplomatic efforts with the countries of South America, especially the border countries, so that they also ratify the Protocol so that a regional solution to the issue can be discussed and implemented.

 

Additional Information: 

World Health Organization: https://www.who.int/health-topics/tobacco#tab=tab_1

Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: https://fctc.who.int/

Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products: https://fctc.who.int/protocol/overview

Referências:

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2003). Decreto de 1º de agosto de 2003. S/N. Cria a Comissão Nacional para Implementação da Convenção-Quadro para o Controle do Tabaco e de seus Protocolos. Disponível em: <http://www.planalto.gov.br/ccivil_03/DNN/2003/Dnn9944.htm>. Acesso em: 9 abr. 2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2005). Decreto Legislativo nº 1.012, de 2005. Aprova o texto da Convenção-Quadro sobre Controle do Uso do Tabaco, assinada pelo Brasil, em 16 de junho de 2003. Disponível em: <https://www2.camara.leg.br/legin/fed/decleg/2005/decretolegislativo-1012-27-outubro-2005-539059-convencao-quadro-36837-pl.html>. Acesso em: 24 abr.2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2006). Decreto nº 5.658, de 2 de janeiro de 2006. Promulga a Convenção-Quadro sobre Controle do Uso do Tabaco, adotada pelos países membros da Organização Mundial de Saúde em 21 de maio de 2003 e assinada pelo Brasil em 16 de junho de 2003. Disponível em: <http://www.planalto.gov.br/ccivil_03/_Ato2004-2006/2006/Decreto/D5658.htm>. Acesso em: 9 abr. 2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República (2017). Projeto de Decreto Legislativo nº 214, de 2017. Declaração Interpretativa ao Protocolo para Eliminar o Comércio Ilícito de Produtos de Tabaco. Disponível em: <https://legis.senado.leg.br/sdleg-getter/documento?dm=7339909&disposition=inline>. Acesso em 24 abr. 2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2018). Decreto Legislativo nº 9.516, de 1º de outubro de 2018. Promulga o Protocolo para Eliminar o Comércio Ilícito de Produtos de Tabaco, de 12 de novembro de 2012. Disponível em: <https://www2.camara.leg.br/legin/fed/decret/2018/decreto-9516-1-outubro-2018-787213-publicacaooriginal-156517-pe.html>. Acesso em 24 abr. 2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2018). Decreto Legislativo nº 9.517, de 1º de outubro de 2018. Institui o Comitê para Implementação do Protocolo para Eliminar o Comércio Ilícito de Produtos do Tabaco. Disponível em: <http://www.planalto.gov.br/ccivil_03/_ato2015-2018/2018/Decreto/D9517.htm>. Acesso em 24 abr. 2019.

BRASIL. Presidência da República. (2017). Decreto Legislativo nº 185, de 2017. Aprova o texto do Protocolo para Eliminar o Comércio Ilícito de Produtos de Tabaco, celebrado em Seul, em 12 de novembro de 2012. Disponível em: <https://www2.camara.leg.br/legin/fed/decleg/2017/decretolegislativo-185-11-dezembro-2017-785909-publicacaooriginal-154466-pl.html>.  Acesso em 24 abr. 2019.

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